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PLACES TO DIVE UK COASTAL DIVES

Loch Fyne

FYNE TIMES

Loch Fyne is the second longest sea loch in Scotland (41 miles) and though it provides excellent diving on the Scottish west coast, it is often overlooked as people head for Oban and the delights of the Western Isles. The lack of facilities in the area compounds the problem, but it does mean the intrepid few enjoy some first class diving without any crowds. ......read more


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john nicolson
posted : January 13, 2010

Back to Loch Fyne.....This has to be the most dived sealoch in Scotland. There are plenty of shore dives and boat dives as well. There are small wrecks to submarines, something for everyone.

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hotshot@22
posted : November 29, 2008

hi there thomas johnstone here aged 22.i was reading fyne times.i noticed the bit bout the basking sharks so i just thought i would pop in and tell you i have dived with them 3years in a row and its AMAZING!also the dolphines i have dived with.i see them all every year.its late agust i find you get them or more likely to see them mostly skipness bay and whiting bay island of arran.i find upper loch fyne a very dark dive?deep waters aswell.i have dived the clyde for 6years for a living.i dive away out colonsay now and jura nice diving out there.mink whale u see a lot of.there is two really handy dive shops in oban thr is puffin which is a dive school aswell.then their is mike ties a good dive shop to,you might find mikes a bit cheaper.anyway hope this is some imformation to you or any1. t,johnstone not very good with pc as im sure yous can tell,lol

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posted : September 10, 2004

Inveraray, loch fyne. I am keen to source out the exact location of the number of millitary tanks that were dropped into loch fyne during the second world war. The area is around the caravan park, and the wildlife park. Local rumour has it that the excercise was to try and see if they would float with a mass of cork and balloons tied to them. it didn't work. If anyone has come across them, please give me a shout.

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posted : September 10, 2004

I and a group of 11 divers have just come back from a weeks diving in the Farnes. The viz in general was 7-10m. There was loads of wildlife from fingers covering wall drop offs to lbbies and crabs to the famous and very inquisitive seals. I have seal teeth marks on my fins to prve the latter. It's a wonderful place to dive; you can visit the samr dive site twicew on consequetive days and its all different. If you want seals though the places i rcommend are 'The Hopper', 'Knifestones'if you can cope with the currents and eddies, and a low lying outcrop to the SE of 'The Hopper'. Anywhere you dive around their is just great. If you want wrecks, we dived the Somali twice; it'sonly diveable at slack water, but then again thats the only time the bouy pops up!! Put your own shot line down; the local hard boats tend to moor onto the resident shot line. A group of fellow Service divers were not too impressed when a hard boat came along, lifted the line by 3m to tie on while two divers were decompressing at 6m!! If you want any more info drop a line below. PS we launched from Beadnell each day; it may be alonger haul to the Islands but its cheaper than Seahouses if you have more than 2 divers aboard.

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posted : September 10, 2004

Quebec Marine Services Argyll Caravan Park Dive Centre Inveraray. have a large 350bar compressor and storage bank on site at the caravan park 1 mile from Inveraray. For more information in diving Loch Fyne see the WEB site at Quebec Marine Services

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posted : September 10, 2004

This is one of our club's most common dive locations throughout the year, we call our selves the 'Morpeth Dolphins', and live in and around Northumberland. I have a couple of minor problems with some things that have been said about the Farnes in some articles. The first is that the Farnes is not just for 'experienced' divers. In all of the places I mention it is highly recommended to use a SMB, because of the amount of divers, and, depending on where you dive, the strength of the current, and to stop getting chopped up by propellors of any passing dive/pleasure/sightseeing boats! There are certain places that are suitable for divers new to the delights of diving in the open sea. One of these is the area known as Brada Bay. The depth varies from 6 to 25(ish) metres, with an absolutely amazing amount of gullies, etc. It can be dived at any state of the tide, but if the wind is from the east, common sense will tell you if you can dive the place or not! At the south end of the bay, the current can be seen as a smooth area of water, avoid this or run the risk of being swept to Norway. All of this may make it sound very unsuitable, but it is'nt, take a look and see, all dive boat skippers in the area will know it. Another area that can be dived by all is the 'Bluecaps'. This area is nearly completely enclosed, only open to the South, and a small 'gut' to the North. Again, if you go past the edge of the wall to the south, hello Norway! If you stray into the tide running through the 'gut' you will head either north or south, depending on the state of tide. Both of these are easy to avoid, even for novices. Next, Seahouses is not the only place to stay. Beadnell, a few miles south of Seahouses,has (apart from Bank Holidays), plenty of parking, launch facilities, toilets & showers, as well as plenty of B&B's. There is even a place to get your bottle filled, Stan's, ask when you get there, he has B&B, as well as boat charter. The last, and final, problem is the wreck printed in the name of the 'Somalia'. Uh-uh, the 'Somali' lies about two miles to the east of Beadnell, straight out to sea from the end of the point. Although an excellent dive, I agree with the comment that it must be dived on slack, and only by experienced divers. Most of the wreck is in a very bad state, but it is amazing what can be seen on a good day. The last time we were on this wreck, we found jars of cold cream, tubes of 'MacCleans Peroxide Toothpaste', and various jars and bottles which used to, (and in some cases still do), contain whatever medicines or cosmetics were in them when the ship was sunk. Some of the biggest Pollack I have ever seen are among the wreckage too! Anyway, to all you divers out there that have not yet dived up here, get up and enjoy yourselves. If I can give you any help, drop me a maily, and I'll do my best.

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