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PLACES TO DIVE UK COASTAL DIVES

Cornwall
WESTWARD HO!

Cornwall often seems remote from the remainder of the UK and has a history full of myth, legend, smuggling and illicit shipwrecking. It is, of course, one of the UKs most popular tourist areas, offering both a slower pace of life with a mild climate and miles of unspoilt coastline and secluded beaches. The rugged granite of the Cornish peninsula juts out into the Atlantic and provides a marked contrast between the calm sleepy inlets, coves and fishing villages of the south coast and the dramatic towering cliffs and the might of the open ocean on the north coast....read more
Places to stay in Cornwall
Coombe House
Coombe house Bed and Breakfast situated on the Rame peninsula in South East Cornwall is the ideal location for your diving stay in Cornwall. 3 miles from Whitsand bay and the now famous 'scylla' dive site. The surrounding area offers an abundance of wrecks, reefs and underwater wildlife.

We have ample parking on site and are a 15 minute drive from Plymouth Harbour and the historical Barbican Torpoint slip is a mere 10 minute drive.

Relax, unwind and enjoy your diving experience with us at Coombe House.
www.coombehouse-cawsand.com

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scuba paul
posted : October 20, 2015

Hi, I work for a south eastern based dive centre called Oyster (London and Brighton). I am looking at planning some new dive trips to Cornwall and would like to hear advice from any of you out there as to places recommended to stay and also nice dive sites. Not necessarily boat, shore dives would be just as nice with some of the beautiful coves and harbours around the cornwall coastline. Please comment via this post and let me know. Many thanks, Paul

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rob the diver
posted : January 24, 2014

www.youtube.com/channel/UChjkWalRyYsn7WF4Q-A83BA

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rob the diver
posted : January 24, 2014

www.youtube.com/channel/UChjkWalRyYsn7WF4Q-A83BA visit for all your locations in cornwall,devon

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Cornishpete
posted : October 05, 2013

Hi Mike. the Merchant Seamen's memorial on Tower Hill, London can be seen at this website http://www.benjidog.co.uk/Tower%20Hill/Lady%20Glanely%20to%20Lancastria.html scroll down from the first ship shown (lady glanely) and you will see the names of the twelve seamen who died on the Lady of The Isles. You might have a mystery to solve as it lists F. Edmonds as the master but you mention a Raleigh Haller. RNVR. It will be interesting to discover the reason for the discrepency. Cornish Pete

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mikebackford
posted : August 14, 2013

As with CornishPete's posting this is not related to diving but I would be interested to make contact with you as I have been researching the lives of those named on the War Memorial in Backford Church, one of whom is Raleigh Haller RNVR who was in command of Lady of the Isles when she was sunk in 1940. However, I have no information on the other crew members and I have seen reference to just three others on board, though other sourecs say as many as 12.

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rob the diver
posted : April 04, 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl2QAU_9e8s godvery island,st ives (north cornwall) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z39MLgk_sKI falmouth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9af5MK3TXQ perranporth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfKPXvHDKdA coverack http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PFX5k04ubI porthlevan

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Cornishpete
posted : March 25, 2013

I am not into diving and live in the USA Mid-west but came across this site while looking for info on a ship, "Lady of the Isles" which was sunk in 1940. You are correct in thinking she was mined while under tow and one of my uncles was killed. There is a memorial to him and the crew of about 12 persons on the memorial to merchant seamen on Tower Hill London. they are listed under the name of the ship, "Lady of the Isles". My uncle Bill was William M Moyse of St Austell. I see that the original mention of the vessel was way back in 2005 but I thought this info might be of some interest.

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rob the diver
posted : July 22, 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfVB9VobdYk mullion Cove http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzhacW7j2K0 church cove

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rob the diver
posted : July 22, 2012

http://finstrokes.com/scubaforum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5886 http://finstrokes.com/scubaforum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5864

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rob the diver
posted : July 22, 2012

http://finstrokes.com/scubaforum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5892

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Ergo
posted : July 31, 2011

Port Gaverne: Just east of Port Isaac (down the hill to the next small bay). The area in which Doc Martin is filmed is Port Gaverne. As a Cornish dive site it is ranked one of the best so far, even though I have only been to a few and have a list as long as your arm of ones I want to visit. Parking is difficult due toi it being a very small fishing village, the working locals are really nice and helpful as long as you respect their boats and don't sit or drape kit all over them. The entry is a beach entry that starts at the slipway from the road. There is a wall here just high enough for an adult or tall child to use to get BC and tank on. Depending if the tide is out or in depends on the walk you have to do or how far you have to swim but at high tide if you look down there are plenty of fish in the bay. As you swim out to the right you will see what I think is called castle rock, there is a gully that at low tide is about 2m most of the way then dropping to 5m and then to about 11m, at high tide it is about 13m, next time I sit and write one of these I promise to check my computer logs so am a bit more accurate, it is fairly close to within 1mish. The kind of life, well if you like star fish, lobster, cuttlefish then this is the place for you. A few fish species; I think Bass and mackerel but am always seeing fish when it gets darker from the seaweed or rock overhangs. These are pretty cool as it makes you feel like you are in a cave at times and is a little narrow but safe as can exit upward over the tip of the seaward rocks back into the main gully. When it is calm this is an amazing place, if you study starfish you have to see them, literally thousands. I saw cuttlefish (how awesome are they) after we got through the gully and dropped off the edge to the 12-13m sandy floor. Be careful around the top though as a few lobster around that area only warn you once. It is a pure sun trap on the right day(obviously DOH!) and if they are recording Doc Martin and the set goes quiet they will give you a funny look even if you joke about making a louder one. There are toilets down the south west road, a few yards from the turning. A burger van that does pasties (think it was about 2.80 for a pasty) and things a great cuppa. There are a few caves on the east side, a nice swim through that you have to loop around and some caves I won't go in......yet but they are only really accesible at higher tides so can walk in them when tide is out. The Gully can be a bit swirly, can't remember the term but is very narrow to get into on the east side of the bay and the surges (got it lol) push you in and out (shaking you all about) and are pretty good fun, you just have to kick at the right time else you stand still like I did and then rocket forward. Once through and you drop down it is worth the swim or walk though.

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Ergo
posted : July 30, 2011

Noticed no one has posted in this thread for a while with info on dive sites in Cornwall, as a local diver I can comment on a few I have visited so far. Newquay Headland: To the eastern side of the headland car park is the old slipway for the lifeboat, this is one entry but is pretty steep. At the far end of the car park is a small path ot the right and back on your self across the rocks, you can see the last entry point standing next to the fence before the wooden posts. A small step to get down (and back up) has a few rocks part of the way down for footing. As you walk down the next slope to the right the footing is better than it looks then when you have walked a small section to the right it opens into the small granite bordered bay, this sounds worse than it is and is the easiest entry point by far on the east side of the headland. At lowest tide you can still stride straight in to about 2.5m. When the tide is in you can stride straight into about 5-5.5m. The tide does come in a fair way so leaving gear a little further back up the slope is a good idea. Another entry point is not for the faint hearted, or less mobile. Just south of the car park and east over the grass at the end of the fence is a path leading down to the right, it is a small path and extremely steep. As with all things with a greater risk is the reward when you get to the bottom, it is locally called seal cove because a male has always lived there. Talking of seals, when in the water at the entry point at the north and east end of the car park over the rocks, if you swim north just around the outcrop is another cave with a female and her pup. A very big caution is that fishermen(women) use the area a lot so keep an eye out for lines in the water. all around that side of the headland. In the water the kind of life you will see are Bass, Pollock, Mackerel, Spider and Velvet crabs (crazy SAS trained camoflague nutters) Lobster, baby cuttlefish and adults at times, flatfish, sand eels and quite a few other species. Once there was a large lobster near seal cove but he dissappeared a while ago sadly. The vis varies from almost zero to ten metres on a really calm day and recently we had water temp of 19C. This does vary a lot depending on the time of the year and clear skies as with anywhere. You can easily dive this area for an hour on air and explore it a lot, but to the north past the female seal's cave is a wall and you should not go past this point if you can help it else you could get swept out to the west for a few miles, you can see the rips though clearly in the water with polarised glasses so just be careful is all I am saying. There are toilets that are open till after 6pm as far as I know as have not seen them closed when I have left after that time, the car parking is with the ticket machine just south of the old lifeboat station by the road, I think it is 6pm and after it is free but not for all night.. A kiosk is there during the summer, 1 for a bottle of water that hasn't been chilled and 1.60 for a bottle of coke. Tubs of Ice cream and cones though. A cool box and flask in the car is a good idea though as all the places nearby are expensive (though very nice) because of Fistral beach to the west of the headland. During the day it can get pretty busy during June, July and August from walkers, fishermen (and women) coasteering groups and surfers on little fistral. As a place to dive that only goes down to 8m or so it is more of a peaceful and relaxing dive in which you can take time to see the abundance of life in English coastal waters and diving in Cornwall has many places like this if you want a relaxing holiday in which to practice the art of enjoying diving again. People have dived off of little fistral to the west, it is a small beach down the steps from the car park but I have not so for now will not say what it is like.

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paulf
posted : October 25, 2007

Sadly Dive St. Ives is no more, or Hayle's Gulf Stream shop/school. the diving is good heere - don't miss Lamorna cove on the other coast - fantastic easy access shore/boat diving from 5 - 35 M

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Roey
posted : March 05, 2007

Just been to Dorset and loved it and am enjoying cornwall now so I think I would head back here again

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neil
posted : May 02, 2006

i have dived around st.ives area in cornwall and found it really good.you often see seals,dolphin,porpoise and basking sharks.there are some nice wrecks at 30m and usually the vis is ok 10m or so.i dive with dive st.ives who i find a great outfit with a wealth of experience and local knowledge,they can be found on the net.hope this is of some help to you,happy dives,neil

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Chrissie
posted : March 29, 2006

Can anyone tell me about the diving in this area? Thanks, Chrissie.

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paddlesat16
posted : August 23, 2005

Eveylyn, I don't think Diver's actually disturb the wreck but on the whole take pictures. Even if it was a war grave they would still show respect as most wrecks are protected. Besides Most war graves are visited and wreaths are left from the relatives by local divers etc.

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The Kremsertor
posted : February 12, 2005

message to Eveylyn, I'm not aware of any loss of life on the Lady of the Isles, at the time of loss (03/10/1940). She was under tow & detonated a mine...... As it happens I recommend diving the Lady of the Isles as it's normally a nice dive. The wreck was bought years ago by a man called Gifford Pound, who holds most of her bridge gear etc in his workshop. He doesn't mind groups diving the wreck.... unless you upset him.

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TrisRD
posted : December 24, 2004

I agree with you there Rob S.. By visiting a wreck we are simply visiting the wildlife on and around the wreck site and exploring the wreck and surroundings. Yes there are some divers that take things from wrecks but they are often looked down upon when it is a protected wreck. 99% of divers are just there to study the wildlife and take pictures, is there anything wrong with this?? People are allowed to freely walk cemeterys and take photos should they wish. Look at it another way, i bet if there spirits are there on the wreck they are glad to have some company..

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posted : September 10, 2004

TO:- Evelyn Andrews You speak of respect, most divers visit wrecks and know the history of each wreck they visit, its part of the diving culture, most just visit and view a wreck as it is, a part of our maritime history. I must say that you must view everybody in certain cultures/hobbys in fact any group in one light, and from your comments, a bad light! By the way, do you not visit graveyards to pay your respects to parted family members or friends? Is it vanderlism to drift across a war grave viewing nature reclaim and make use of such a vessel? NO.

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