Decompression Illness The Hidden Dangers
20 February Tuesday, 12:56 PM


Find out more at the Sub Aqua Association DCI Seminar Day
– Sunday 25th March

Diving Medicine is not widely taught in the UK Medical Profession, hence many Accident and Emergency Departments don’t fully appreciate the implication of diving related sickness, such as Decompression Illness (DCI). For the most part, as a diver suffering from DCI, you look perfectly healthy and fine. You are not bleeding all over the floor with the odd limb hanging off. It’s therefore worth knowing something about Decompression Illness and how it is treated, so that if you need to, you can make DCI symptoms very clear to medical staff, and stress the urgency of recompression, fluids and oxygen.

"Recognising that you possibly have decompression illness and you need treatment is so important", stated Bob Cole, SAA Decompression Officer, CMAS Technical Director and Decompression Author. "In many cases divers either go straight into denial or they don’t recognise they are sick. It doesn’t always fit neatly into a pigeon hole. Identifying and getting treated for a bend might seem simple in the textbooks, but in real life it not necessarily so. When three of my friends all took unearned hits I thought it was time that we should start talking publicly about this illness, consequently I’ve set up this one day seminar, at the London Welsh Centre starting at 9:15 prompt on Sunday 25th March.

The day will revolve around these three individuals, with each diver explaining exactly what happened to them, and how they felt emotionally and physically after taking a bend. With the accident scenario set, Hyperbaric Doctors John King, Jules Eden and Olly Sykes will explain the situation from their point of view, with the Seminar including facts about PFO’s (Patent Foramen Ovale) and Lung Shunts (similar to PFO, but in the lungs) in relation to diving. I am pleased to say that the MCA Coastguard will be giving us their input and there will also be a presentation about Diver Denial. Everyone does denial in some form, an old lady falls over on the pavement and says she is ok, yet there is blood pouring from her leg, and divers are no different.

It is time that divers start treating DCI as a sports injury, and recognise signs and symptoms, such as extreme fatigue post diving or a personality change after surfacing.

The SAA’s moto is "The Friendliest Divers in the World", and we are. I see only divers, not badges, so the 200 spaces on this seminar are open to all divers on a first come, first served basis. I’ve been diving 50 years, and I am still learning today. It’s worth remembering that 2/3rds of all DCI cases are within the limits of tables and dive computers being used. So please come along and learn, and gain a better understanding of decompression illness problems and treatment. Audience participation is very important, and it will be your chance to ask those questions you’ve never had the opportunity to, or that you have been too scared to utter.

Entrance to the Seminar is by pre-bought ticket, priced £12.00 and includes a light bite. To buy your tickets contact Juliet at the London Diving Chamber by email on info@londondivingchamber.co.uk We look forward to seeing you at the London Welsh Centre, 157 – 163 Gray’s Inn Road, London, WC1X 8UE on the 25th March. Registration begins at 08:45am".



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